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Sacraments Defined
(Note that All of these Sacraments can be administered by R.C.C. Priests)

Baptism

Baptism is the sacrament by which a person is solemnly admitted to membership in the church universal and grafted into the mystical body of Christ. Generally, we pour or sprinkle holy water over a person's head. However, a person may be fully immersed if he/she so desires and the facility to so is available. In either case, Holy Baptism is done in the Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit. We baptize infants when requested by the child's parents. The parents may also designate 'godparents' to assist in nurturing the child's faith until the child reaches an age of so-called accountability (usually 12-14 years of age) when he/she can personally confirm his/her faith.

Confirmation

Confirmation, administered in the Celtic tradition in conjunction with adult baptism, is the sacramental rite by which the confirmed receives spiritual strength for the life of faith to which the person is committing through the invocation of the Holy Spirit and laying on of hands of the celebrant. In the case of those baptized as infants, it is administered at the so-called age of accountability when the confirmand affirms his or her Christian faith.

Holy Eucharist

Eucharist, meaning "Thanksgiving," is the sacrament wherein bread and wine are consecrated and thereby linked with the life of Christ. They become to us outposts of Christ's life and consciousness, thus enabling the person receiving them to become a channel of Christ's life and blessing. We believe in the "real presence" of Christ, taking Christ at His word, "This IS my body... This IS my blood." However, we do not try to explain how this is so with terms like 'transubstantiation' or 'co-substantiation'. We accept it as a Mystery (the Greek meaning of the Latin word for Sacrament). We practice open communion. Any one, regardless of religious background, may receive the Body and Blood of Christ at RCC altars.

Confession and Absolution

The sacrament by which there is a restoration and reconciliation of the inner harmony of nature which has been disturbed by wrongdoing, a bringing of a person once more into tune with the divine power which flows through us all and with God. Confession may be performed privately with a RCC clergyperson or in a general confession in the context of a public liturgy. Through confession one's absolution by the atoning death of Jesus Christ is re-affirmed.

Extreme Unction/Last Rites/Anointing

The sacrament by which the body is anointed with holy oils for the spiritual strengthening of the person, as well as for healing of the physical body. The Sacrament is routinely administered to those who are close to death but may also be used in healing the sick.

Marriage

The sacrament in which two people bind themselves to each other through vows of mutual commitment and in which the celebrant gives the blessing of the Church. It is viewed as a sign of the relationship which exists between Christ and the Church. In the Celtic tradition, marriage is also referred to as hand-fasting.

Holy Orders

The sacrament rite by which, in their various degrees, ministers of the gospel receive power and authority to perform their sacred duties. The RCC maintains the Apostolic Succession of Bishops. We ordain Priests and Deacons. We also have un-ordained clergy who are candidates for Holy Orders. They are Episcopally Commissioned Missionaries approved by the RCC Pastoral Council. An Episcopally Commissioned Missionary can perform many of the functions of a Priest or Deacon.

Sacraments Available

Disert Missal

 

The Disert Missal is a liturgical resource for Reformed Celtic Church clergy and communities.  Liturgy comes from a Greek word meaning "work of the people."  Consequently, local communities may develop liturgies to meet their specific needs and reflect their distinctive character.  The services listed here are not carved in granite and may be modified.  They are offered as a guide and resource.

 

Mornimg Prayer

may be officiated by a Bishop, Priest, Commissioned Missionary, Deacon, Abbot, Abbess, or Layperson

 

Evening Prayer

may be officiated by a Bishop, Priest, Commissioned Missionary, Deacon, Abbot, Abbess, or Layperson

 

Holy Eucharist

may be officiated by a Bishop, Priest, or Commissioned Missionary

 

Dalriadan Rosary

may be officiated by a Bishop, Priest, Commissioned Missionary, Deacon, Abbot, or Abbess

 

Service for Ash Wednesday

may be officiated by a Bishop, Priest, Commissioned Missionary, Abbot, or Abbess

 

Tenebrae Service for Maundy Thursday

may be officiated by a Bishop, Priest, Commissioned Missionary, Abbot, or Abbess

 

Easter Sunrise Prayer Service

may be officiated by a Bishop, Priest, Commissioned Missionary, Deacon, Abbot, or Abbess

 

Infant Baptism

may be officiated by a Bishop, Priest, Commissioned Missionary, Deacon, Abbot, or Abbess

 

Adult Baptism

may be officiated by a Bishop, Priest, Commissioned Missionary, Deacon, Abbot, or Abbess

 

Confirmation

may be officiated by a Bishop, Priest, or Commissioned Missionary

 

Holy Matrimony

may be officiated by a Bishop or Priest

 

Requiem Service

may be officiated by a Bishop, Priest, Commissioned Missionary, Deacon, Abbot, or Abbess

 

Ordination of a Deacon

may be officiated by a Bishop, or Priest with the consent of the Council of Bishops

 

Ordination of a Priest

may be officiated by a Bishop with the consent of the Council of Bishops

 

Consecration of a Bishop

may be officiated by a Bishop with the consent of the Council of Bishops

 




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